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below 2% gdp and bring down national debt dead relative to size relative to size of the economy in 10 years. brewster the nation's fiscal cut that tax loopholes that take a fair and balanced approach. at the same time the budget incorporates elements to speaker by last december. they make the difficult choices to find common ground. consistent with that offer come in the budget includes being the president would not put forward such as means testing command that a character in a related premiums and the more accurate the less generous measure of inflation. it includes proposals only so they come together around a complete and comprehensive package to shrink the deficit by $1.8 trillion over 10 years and are meant the fiscal uncertainty that hampers economic growth and job creation. this remark does not represent the starting point for negotiation. represent tagamet savings and additional roadrunners for those of the. the two cannot be separated and were not separated last december when we were close to a bipartisan agreement. this budget provides achievable solutions to fiscal p
to affect business and the economy in the united states and what it all means for your money melissa: straight to our top story tonight, the city of boston, massachusetts, is still reeling following yesterday's horrific bombing near the finish line of the boston marathon. president obama speaking out today on the tragedy, calling the attack, an act of terrorism. now with the latest news out of boston is fox news's craig boswell. >> the bombs detonated at the boston marathon used six liter pressure cookers packed with shards of metal, nail and ball bearings. they were place inside a black duffel bag and set on the ground. >> we had an attack. >> doctors removed sharp objects from lower extremities of victims. >> many have wound mostly in the lower part of their body, wound rated to the place effect of the bomb as well as small metallic fragments. >> the two bombs exploded about 12 seconds apart. the first near the finish line where 8-year-old martin richard was there to cheer on his father. the little boy was killed in the blast. when he ran back to his mother,wo siblings. bill richar
or does it matter if an economy will print or grow or whatever? >> the study which said once government debt hits 90% of gdp growth goes off a cliff has been thoroughly discredited and they must kick themselves that they made a mistake on the spreadsheet. people pay attention to the paper which has just come out that shows that this is a pretty sloppy piece of work. the conclusion drawn in terms of the impact of high debt to growth has been basically discredited now. it's fairly clear that governments have a lot more scope to deal with problems. >> was china wrong to pursue this strategy then to help cushion the effect of the global financial crisis and even though people are quite concerned about it including some of the chinese themselves, it sounds like from what you're saying all things considered you don't see a hard landing or crisis as a result. >> as you always say in china, it's too early to tell. i think they have a margin to get things right. if you look at greece, they went into european monetary union and have this lovely window to fix things. a lot of credit with foreign i
that it doubles down on a dead end energy policy that's hurting our economy, hurting our environment and our health. burning fossil fuels is a primary cause of climate change, and we simply can't afford to continue down this destructive path. it makes far more sense to focus on developing the clean, renewable energy technologies that we all know we're going to need down the road. developing these technologies will create quality, long-term jobs that can't be shift overseas. it's good for business. it's good for our planet. it's good for our national security. there's no reason why we can't put aside our differences and take action to promote a clean energy future. it's what our constituents sent us here to do. our window of opportunity is rapidly closing. the time to act is now. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam
market since the start of this cycle. weakness in oil could portend investors worries that the economies are slowing down not just in china but globally as well. so that will probably put pressure on the market. the other thing too, we're in the earnings season and this might be the quarter that doesn't delight. that is that we do get some dispoints manned -- disappointments and we get stiff reactions to the disappointments. lori: bob, you were cautious yet looking for stocks to show gains for the year. what do you think will get us past these bumps in the road? >> i think the bumps in the road should not be unexpected. the market is up 20% since last june. so it is not unusual to have a five to 7% correction at this stage. following on gene's comments, we are in earnings season. interesting when you look this year, i think that will be stimulus for further correction. expectations are 5% increase over last year for this quarter. 7% for the second quarter. 18% for the third quarter and 28 for the fourth. i think as companies report, analysts will be really focused on what the guidance be
worried about china especially about the economy after the lower than expected growth numbers that we saw this week. and he addressed that. he was talking a bit about the concerns about rising debt levels and he played those down. he played down the weaker growth. >> i don't think people should panic about chinese economy will continue to grow at the sustainable level. the government's target could be fulfilled without much difficulty and we aim at the quality of the growth. i don't think achieving 7, 7.5% is a big deal for china. i don't think so. >> the fund invests heavily in resources. i couldn't help myself from asking him specifically about gold. he believes the sudden drop in gold is general instability in the global economy. he hopes it comes back at some point soon. >> thank you very much. we were watching that and that's the perfect segue. we've been watching what's happening and it's important to see what the chinese think about this and no better person than cic chairman. we'll talk about gold and what's been happening not only with gold but also oil prices after yesterday slu
, and the economy. without it, things simply can't exist. woman: we have good health in this country, in part, because we have clean water. and we shouldn't forget that, and we shouldn't take it for granted. melosi: in the late 19th century, serious waterborne disease epidemics were having devastating effects. roy: but then, in the early 1900s, we began to treat our water. and since then, we've seen a rapid decline in the incidence of waterborne disease. narrator: most cities treat drinking water through filtration, chlorination, and sometimes ozonation to kill pathogens in the source supply. these are complex treatment plants that cost millions of dollars to operate, but are necessary for our wellbeing. the treatment of drinking water has been called one of the greatest public health achievements of the last century. the water infrastructure itself protects the treated water until it comes out of our taps. it's been since 1911, since we had an outbreak of cholera or typhoid in the united states. but that doesn't mean that it can't happen. it can happen. if we aren't on our guard all the time
, boost the u.s. economy as supporters claim it will? lou dobbs is here. lori: let's update you on the markets as we do every 15 minutes, happening fast and furiously. we have the first check in this hour with nicole. what's the word on the floor among traders there, nicole? >> a couple things to note, obviously, we were selling off, back looking at what we looked at on monday, monday, we dropped 265 points, below even those levels. the vix, fear index, up 20% easily showing the nervousness in the market. selling across the board, particularly in economic sensitive areas like energy and technology, and apple, for example, below $400, and we'll is more on that throughout the show. the one thing to note is the volume is not as heavy like we saw on monday. there's less volume and less conviction to the selling; however, the selling is happening across the board. there's economically sensitive areas like financials bringing me to bank of america. reporting their quarterly numbers, look at bank of america. this weighing on the dow jones industrials, but more importantly, bank of amer
with the underpinnings of education and issues like that then allow us to be competitive in a global economy. i think the potential is there. we need to get our act together and that means we need to sit down, work together and resolve issues. .ost: larry, ohio independent caller. caller: good morning. host: good morning. caller: this gentleman keeps referring to the crime scenes, the violent crimes. 99% of us gun owners are law- abiding and that is the way we use our guns. internet sales -- you cannot ship a gun in the united states unless it is shipped by a fll dealer and once you receive that done at your dealer, you have to go through background checks. on the crystal ball thing -- host: larry, let me leave it there and have the congressman respond because that is the front page of "the new york times" dealing with internet sales. what do you make of his comment? guest: first of all, we do have background checks today, but the problem is there are loopholes. the number is about half of the gun sales in the country are not subject to a background check. some are emaciated on the internet. some are
into the future. they're estimating the pace of growth for economies around the world. joining us now from the business desk. good morning. what do they see? >> good morning. the results overall point to slower growth. those in japan suggest things are picking up. the international monetary fund has upgraded japan's economic outlook the next two years on expectations the country's bold monetary easing policy and weaker yen will help boost its economy. imf officials released the world's latest economic outlook and slowly downgraded the world economic forecast. and predict it will grow 1.6% this year, up .4 of a percentage point and they doubled the growth forecast next year to 1.4%. they expect the bank of japan's aggressive monetary easing to boost the growth rate. >> japan is forge iing a path o its own. it may have been more likely to call this a 3 1/2 recovery rather than a speed recovery. >> although the yen value has declined significantly in the recent past, the monetary policy followed by the boj is appropriate but at the same time, imf officials urge japan to work out a long term f
. -- voyeurism. >> there will will certainly be taking a very close look. >> the world's emerging economy are saying german investment and bilateral trade. last week it was the indian leader here signing off and billions in deals. >> this tuesday, the ecuador president has been at the german capital. he is here for the 13th annual conference. the region is in the midst of a massive boom with german exports up by 39% last year alone. >> he is in germany for the first time. the president has high expectations of berlin and he is full of praise for his own country. >> ecuador is one of the most dynamic countries and latin america. the economy across latin america grew by 3.5% between 2007 and 2012. but in ecuador, it grew by 3.3%. >> the small, latin american country has not been very high on the german business sectors agenda until now. generally, interest in latin america has grown considerably recently. that is despite trade barriers in certain areas. german investment already amounts to 30 billion euros. >> they just the same difficulty as others. medium-sized companies today are ready t
and the economy did not help the last 10 years to make that story any better. so with that, i want to just give a hearty thanks to maria's leadership for the last decade-and-a-half for putting together this project and her continued perseverance to make this happen. today we celebrate the sale of the land for the transbay transit tower. to the entrance transbay transit authority, for the first time i met mr. heinz, i can going to hang out with them more because i have heard a lot of stories between you that will help me run this city better. i will say that when this transit tower is complete, it will have the impact of transforming our city skyline with the tallest structure west of the mississippi and chicago. i'm about to leave for china tomorrow, and i get to go to china and tell them we've got the tallest building west of the mississippi, what about you? they are probably going to tell me they have tall buildings there as well but we at least have bragging rights. the state of the art, sustainable features, a plan, 1.4 million square foot office tower, developed, owned and operated by he
the state of the economy. other people are talking about technical reactions, but also the numbers from the usa are not as good anymore. bank of america reported results that have been far on next -- under expectations. >> we will stay in frankfurt for a closer look at the numbers. the dax -- it is down by more than 2.3%. the euro stoxx 50 is down by more than 2%. across the atlantic, things there are also down in negative territory. the euro is drifting lower against the greenback, trading at a value of 1.3044. >> the british retailer tesco, the world's third-largest, says it is pulling out of the u.s. market. profits fell for the first time in 20 years. >> empathy says it wants it wants to refocus on its british operations ash the company says it wants to refocus on its british operations -- the company says it wants to refocus on its british operations. >> millions of germans were disappointed today when they went to get their mail and, lo and behold, the letterboxes were empty. no holiday postcards from friends. that's because thousands of postal workers have gone on warning strik
is the most important issue? is it the economy? or foreign affairs? what about health care programs? those are all very important issues but done to think if there is one central issue that can solve all our other problems, we should tackle it first? you may be thinking what should this be? it is simple. what then can give the kids the knowledge they need to solve all these other problems? it is education. if we can well-educate our current generation from toddlers to young adults and they have the tools they need to tackle all of these major problems -- >> public school education in this country has taken a back seat to other concerns. abelieve that hurts us as nation. one of the things that has made us so competitive throughout the years passed this the fact that we have had public school education, compulsory public school education. many countries do not invest in that. it is an investment in our future. >> we invest so much into the system but sometimes outcomes are not what we would like. american u.s.n educational system that is failing grossly. there's an issue of states' rights or
go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur ♪ neil: we are live right now, engaging. how things are going in japan. last night at this time the market was clearing those losses as the night ensued. we were coming to you live. seeinghe market averages. most of the march to the upside. our own futures were flat to down. flat to slightly up prior to the news of a u.s. senator reports that he as a letter that tested positive. the letter never reached the senator we might point out. but it was wrote to him, and that is where they stopped it at a postal center in maryland. it does raise those eerie parallels to 9/11. he knows that better than the former new york stock exchange chairman and ceo who joins me right now on the phone. yuri parallels a night. totally
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monetary fund now predicts the global economy will grow by 3.3% this year, down 0.2 of a point since its january forecast. the imf says the u.s. economy will expand by a slightly smaller 1.9% while eurozone economies will swing slightly. >>> car ownership comes with its own expenses, and it's a lot more than you probably realize. a new report out by aaa found that owning an average sedan will drain you over a thousand when you factor in gas, main tense, and tires. that cost is up about 2% from last year mostly because of an 11% surge in maintenance costs. anne-marie? >> erica ferrari here in new york. thanks, erica. >>> straight ahead, your morning weather. plus, in sports, the voice of the nfl goes silent. we will remember legendary broadcaster pat summerall. legendary broadcaster pat summerall. want to give your family more vitamins, omega 3s, and less saturated fat? it's eb. eggland's best eggs. better taste. better nutrition. better eggs. it's eb. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be
.s. economy is headed south. lots of negative indicators recently, what do you say? >> i think that the u.s. economy is already in the south. if you will, and we don't show many signs of coming back, because of very bad policies coming out of washington. i mean, these things should be-- we should be lowering tax rates and broadening the tax base and controlling spending where it should be controlled and having free trade, minimal regulations, but we're going in the wrong direction, stuart. i think you're right. >> what about that question about everybody printing money? well, they are, we know that, but, i don't think it's working this time around. it's just not, you know, juicing the stock market like it used to. >> i don't think it used to so i agree with you totally. you can't push on a string and they have been trying to push on a string and if you look at it this is the single worst u.s. recovery in history and obviously, it's the largest single monetary expansion in history. and obviously, they don't work, they just don't work and he's grasping at straws and god knows what type of r
but if we meet in the middle we can do a lot of good for americans and for our economy. we are feeling very good about this, things are moving in a very good way and the supported -- the president supported our proposal it is in the right place to be because even if people don't agree with every single part i don't want to give you the impression he is begrudging but he is enthusiastic. and we are playing it just right moving forward by giving us the space to come up with the agreement and we thank him for doing that and he will continue to do that to get a bill done. >> we briefed the president on a number of details and a proposal that gang of 8 is coming up with that we will be bringing forward to the united states senate as short of a time as this evening. but the process we went through having been in the senate to have this process before was very supportive. the president realizes everybody didn't want -- get what they wanted completely but it is a product of compromise we appreciate his support and we believe that is important as we move forward with the process. that this is the be
the economy was already reeling into a recession at that time. and, of course, the economy presumably is coming out with one this time. earnings at that time were torpedoing. earnings right now on the upside so there are a lot of fundamental differences that still the fundamentals are very, very different. we have to watch ourselves. there will be plenty of time to do finger pointing. when you find a politician on either side doing finger pointing at this point i suggest you raise a certain figure at that politician. let's focus on getting these good folks barry, including that 8-year-old boy. sequestration did not kill that little fellow. you know what did? awful people. more after this. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. becausenly national lets you choose any car in t aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and stilpay the misize price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] es, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. yes,
of the economy, they are desperate, some are bidding on projects they shouldn't take. how do i know i am working with somebody who is appropriate for me? >> if you're paying for that insurance, you're proud to show th certificate and if someone is resistant to show you the proof of insurance, they don't have insurance and it is important with the nature of a lot of the situation now with workman's comp, it is very important, don't let anybody work in her house without th proper insurance. very fair question to ask the contractor to show proof of that insurance. gerri: i want a contract, but tell me one or two things that absolutely must make sure our in those contracts that i know about. >> who is handling everything. the trash and the debris and removal and the permits,ome of those things you might not think about are very important and can be very important. not only are you looking at what is included in the contract and what is included in the price, but also what's not included, that's extremely important. gerri: great to see you, you have to come back soon and talk to us about fixing up th
is a realization now that the market is probably well ahead of itself, based on what the economy is, based on what we're seeing happening around the world in china, certainly what's going on in europe. so the fact is that investors all of a sudden are deciding, geez, we better start paying attention to this news, becausing the market is well ahead of itself. so what you're seeing is the market backing off and really coming back or trying to come back to a state of equilibrium between where the economy is and where the market should be. the whole boston thing and boston marathon and that down in d.c. is certainly adding some angst to the market, but that's not the reason the market is off 170 points. part of it is much more technical just in terms of market action. >> but, michael, when we saw the market come off the lows, it happened to be when we thought there was an arrest. is that a coincidence with the markets? >> i think to some extent, there's going to be a little bit of a relief move if you see some kind of arrest really happen, but these deflationary pressures have been in play since the e
rates. it's tough to make money, michael yoshikami, when you're in that economy and markets are that low. >> it's impossible to make money on the margin. and i think it's important to recognize that what american express is probably getting hit on here is what's happening with tax rates, happened in the first quarter of this year, and the other issue that's really occurring is i think businesses are still holding back on spending. significant percentage of their revenue comes from businesses. and you know, on the long-term, also, we have to be very, very aware, american express, on the long-term, is going to -- >> they're having a fire drill here at the new york stock exchange. >> it was scheduled. >> pre-scheduled, exactly. it was scheduled already. so ignore the noise here happening around me. >> okay. >> very quickly, i want to get to bruce mccain as well, michael. finish your thought. >> my thought was, you have to be careful about companies like paypal, all these other very inexpensive swaywaways to colle money, it will be a hit on american express margins, eventually. >> bruce mcca
nearly 158 points while the nasdaq closed up 48. restored confidence in the world's number one economy sent asian stocks higher this morning. tokyo's nikkei rose 1%. hong kong's hang seng added a fraction. >>> more signs the housing market is recovering. builders started work on a million new homes in march. that hasn't happened since june 2008. and it was fueled by a surge in apartment building construction but single-family home construction fell by nearly 5%. >>> the international monetary fund now predicts global economy will grow by 3.3% this year. that's down two-tenths of a point since its january forecast. the imf says the u.s. economy will expand by a slightly smaller 1.9% while the eurozone economies were shrink slightly. back to you. >> and we understand car ownership and believe me we all know this here in san francisco but it comes with a big price tag, too, doesn't it? >> it sure does. a new report out by aaa found that owning an average sedan will drain about $9,100 a year from your wallet when you factor in gas, insurance and maintenance and tires and that cost is actu
will go. and sometimes invest in a place where the economy is not where it would support necessarily a market solution, which is why a.i.d. has to be there. so you've got the millennium challenge corporation over here, a.i.d. as the preponderance of our expenditure, but it has adopted significant reforms in the last years that have actually movement some of the development challenge kinds of enterprize into a.i.d. wherever we can we are trying to do economic-based aid in a local way that is sustainable. and that will result in long-term gains, not a project that comes, and when the project's over the money's gone and there is nothing to show for it. but there are someplaces where you still have humanitarian demands and other demands that will not lend themselves to that, and we just need to understand that. we have to understand that's for the minimum -- minimalist fraction of the percentage of our aid that may represent, it's still an expression of our values and interest and it's important. now we are -- i'm not going to sit here and tell this committee that the job is done. we are
economy have suddenly acquired this enormous interest in what we thought fifty years ago was -- [inaudible] there are many reasons. one is the arctic sea ice. we will see in the near future, i emphasize the near future, opening up both new shipping routes. linking asia to america and europe in the same way as the suez canal did in its time. one of the reasons why the leadership of china has shown interest in the arctic, they are already planning for a world where china will be the preimminent trading country in the world. and if they send their ships through the northern routes to europe and asia, the distance will be short end by more than 40%. china is already building ships for this purpose. they are already formulating plans indicating the number of vessels that will, in this decade, sail through this route. singapore has already gotten -- [inaudible] with the primary mission of finding a location for a big singapore hopper somewhere until the arctic region. so like the suez canal, indicated are trading transformation of the 20th century. the opening of the northern sea route will indi
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because the economy isn't supporting that. what do you do? how do you respond to that? how do you protect your money? >> well the thing is you have to understand, actually mark hit on a great point, since 2009 revenues only grown by about 7% of the earnings have grown by almost 230%. the disparity's come from things like stock buybacks, accounting gimmickry in terms when do we account for stuff and when we don't. and so what drives corporate growth in the stock markets over the long term is that top line revenue, sales. that's what we node to see. that is what --. melissa: lance, i know that, tell me how do i protect my wealth in light of that? i hear what you're saying but you're reiterating what the guys before you said. we already agree with that. how do i protect my money? >> i know. the point is we're telling you the strength of the economy the economy is getting a lot weaker here. all recent data shows it. it means cash and fixed income will perform better most likely over next six to nine months while we go through this process. melissa: cash, cash is going to perform better?. >> c
companies from investing in this rapidly expanding economy. nhk world. >>> all right. now let's take a look at the market figures. >>> when people read these day, they often turn to electron eck devices. one man in the state of wisconsin is encouraging readers to pick up paper books again. anyone can borrow a book for free provided that they leave one in return. the idea has taken off. nhk has his story. >> reporter: small is beautiful when it comes to reading in america these days. miniature bookshelves like these are popping up on roadsides or in coffee shops across the united states. called little free libraries. they're changing the reading habits of local communities. the idea couldn't be simpler. you grab as many books as you like. and you don't have to bring them back. but you do have to row place them. the rule is, take a book, leave a book. that means the narrow shelves are always full and the stock is always changing. it was todd bowl who came up with the idea for the little free library. >> the first library i built in 2009. and this one has number one. >> reporter: he started th
.s. economy and the deepening crisis in europe. they cut china's growth to 8% from 8.2%. >> a slow down in gdp in china got the blame. but ford does not see it that way, they are protecting that 40% of the sale s will come fro china. they have doubled their capacity, scrambling to keep up with demand to keep up with the market. we have a closer look at ford's rapid expansion there and the challenges it faces. >> he is part of the new wave in china. car buyers turning the western part of the country into one of the hottest auto markets in the world. >> translator: in his mind, he feels that the car, the brand is good. and the service is also excellent. so this is why he trusts this brand. >> here, the gateway to western china, growth in auto sales is particularly good news for ford. at this plant, a new focus roles off the assembly line every minute and within two years ford will be doubling capacity in the area. >> this year, the total volume of the ford, were 600,000. so it's a big, big key. >> growing sales in china have been one of the top goals since he took over ford in 2006. at the time,
. the commission says there's no immediate danger to consumers, but it could be costly to the eurozone economy, and tighter measures are planned. france, greece and denmark had the highest amounts of horse meat in beef. devry, inc., which operates private colleges and training schools, is being investigated by officials in two states. the attornies general of both illinois and massachusetts are investigating. illinois is looking into incentive-based compensation, illegal under laws governing schools participating in federal aid programs. massachusetts wants to know if devry filed false information about its students. devry says it is cooperating with the investigations. general motors edges out volkswagen in first quarter sales as both try to catch up to toyota. gm sold 2.36 million cars and trucks around the world in the first three months of 2013. volkswagen sold 2.27 million vehicles during that same time. toyota was in the lead with most cars sold in 2012. rising maintenance costs are making owning a car more expensive. aaa says car expenses are up 2% from last year. the average sedan now
percent say the economy is the most important issue facing this country. 18 percent say it's unemployment and jobs, of course. satisfaction with the government itself. 16 percent -- i mean, these are the beginnings of a list for anyone's agenda and politics in this country. anyone responsible for government. 11 percent said it's the deficit and debt. now, you may have noticed, we are not seeing any legislation, not hearing a lot of talk about programs and responses to deal with these issues. and then there is, of course, health care. 6 percent. 6 percent say that is the most important issue. 5 percent say it's ethics. i have to say, 5% as a little small for me on this. the ethical and moral and family decline in this country. are you kidding me? 4% say immigration. i know what your thinking. we have seen a huge immigration bill introduced. well, 4 percent say that it's education. the number one issue in the country. and another 4 percent say guns. isn't that interesting? guns. here is what the hundred and 13 congress that succeeded at doing so far this year. they put together seven measur
) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. >>> about 20 minutes past the hour. time to check other top stories. in london, people saying good-bye to the former prime minister margaret thatcher. they was given a ceremonial funeral. security tight with 4,000 police. 2,000 people at the funeral, including queen elizabeth and prince philip. she died of a stroke on april 8th. she was 87. >>> the u.s. senate is set to vote on a bill to tighten gun control laws, first, an expand on background checks and mental health care. and also on the table, a ban on military style assault weapons. >>> senators known as the gang of eight will unveil their long-awaited immigration reform bill, all 844 pages, today. the bill proposes a path to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants and would in
the same with gold. i think the drop in gold is a very positive signal for the longer term economy. but i think these events coming together so rapidly, what went on in boston and the gold crack up and you mentioned commodities, it has given people an excuse to take whatever, 5% to 7% breather in stocks. >> i think that's a good point. what we don't talk about, money coming out of gold is not a bad thing. it's a positive thing in the long run for equities. other commodities especially oil, gasoline prices come down 17% from their peak. i think that's going to be a positive in the economy. so you have to look at the bright side of some of these things. but you're right, it's impossible to separate the emotional from the economic. and we have both going on. a tragedy occurred. it's hard to separate both. >> emotion plays a big role in the stock market. art, thank you very much. we'll resume our coverage of the boston marathon bombing investigation when the kudlow report comes right back. maxwell is not. he's on geico.com setting up an appointment with an adjuster. ted is now on hold with hi
of this economy that are going strong? like housing. a totally domestic industry. not france, not generation not socgen. that's not going to be droild by european woes or a chinese slowdown. they have nothing to do with each other. the housing comeback is still with us. as we know from yesterday's terrific housing starts number. and this is the kind of huge multiyear theme that's going to keep powering forward no matter what you're fretting about. take a look at this chart of new housing starts. you can see that we're very much on the upswing. but we still have a long way to go before we reach the elevated levels that we saw back in 2005-2006. so how do we play the housing resurgence? right now what do we do? what can we snoen what about realogy? a huge realtor that's the world's largest fran schooizer of residential real estate brokerages. coldwell banker, century 21, sotheby's, better homes and garde gardens. last year this company was involved in more thain quarter of all domestic home sales transactions that involved the broker. they are that big. they came public back on october 27th. i
said, joe. she marked a total sea change in britain's relationship with the market economy before she came into power and anything that was considered important in the post-war british era was controlled by the state. nobody would do that today. she had a very permanent difference in the way britain see the mark of the economy and we are now a country which is the product of margaret thatcher's economic vision. >> steve rattner, i have been amused by commentary coming out of great britain one after another after another kr criticizing margaret thatcher on how she took on the unions and there is that line it had to be done. you were a "the new york times" reporter there. you have said the margaret thatcher is why great britain is great britain today and not italy or spain or greece. >> look. i agree. to me, it seems very clear that when she did was to save great britain from economic irrelevance and i think what may explain a little bit of the difference between the british view and the american view is that what she did was radical by british standards because britain had moved so clo
through our bureau of fire prevention, our permits division. so, as a result, we have seen as the economy increases, the revenue coming back to our bureau of fire prevention. however, we are -- because of the work load returning to the bureau, we are requesting additional personnel resources consisting of inspectors being assigned to the bureau to handle that increased work load. the net result of the new anticipated revenues and rotv is counted towards the department's target reduction. the new eoa i talked about, exclusive operating area, will result in a changing ambulance system structure for the department. the department's increase in call volume has already been incorporated into the department's budget. the system as a whole has seen increases in call volume over the past few years and we anticipate we will continue to see this in the next year, resulting in increased revenue. and then again also with the recovery from the emergency medical transport tax or reimbursement. for expenditure reductions, we are reducing our materials and supplies budget in attempt to meet the target. a
plunging through that we could see fat -- further selling not only the u.s. as a global economy but a big energy report to heating oil prices of big loser reporting the lighter than expected demand for the distillates and that continues for out of five trading-- hitting the four month low crude prices falling as the u.s. output debts with the 20 year high. then that shows the commodity winners on the session and agriculture is very strong. a lot of this is seasonal demand the barbeque season begins also natural-gas is higher by about half a percent. cheryl: more breaking news to fox business that jones has downgraded the credit rating from the a-plus down to the a. the asian markets are closed but this could be a big meaningful to the down side for those german stocks. that begin jones has just downgraded germany. of course, bear the financial leaker -- peter with ngela marco and her come padres have been dictating to a the and that is not good news in we will be watching that. >> i view of a big story. >> eagan jones is not accrediting agencies. >> but it is germany. that is a big
investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. ♪ >> yankees paying tribute to the victims in boston playing "sweet caroline." and in cleveland where the red sox play the indians today, moment of silence for those killed in the bombings. tonight we have incredible stories of survival and heroism. with me now john nixon who helped rescue innocent bystande bystanders. kevin cullen, you wrote a moving piece today in which you said we lost our innocence on another perfect day in september 12 years ago and lost something monday too, and that is the idea we'll ever feel totally safe in this city again. is that how you think many people in boston feel today? >> well, piers, i think that when i wrote that, i probably was a little more despondent than i should've been. i was sad yesterday, i'm angry today and i got that sense from the city today talking to people. we will never be the same. it's just that new york was -- will never be the same after 9/11. that doesn't mean
marathon runners and that has fostered culture and now, even a whole economy you wouldn't know existed unless you went looking. this is a runner named ambi burrfoot. he won the marathon in 1968. he was less than a mile from the finish yesterday when the explosions put there. it is hard to believe this attack targeted the marathon, but even if it was hit as a symbol of something else, it was hit in a way that mean it is world to a whole community of people who run. he wrote today in runners world, this wasn't just an attack against the marathon. it was our use of the streets. we have used our public roadways for annual parades, protest marchers, marathons and all over manner of events. the roads belong to us and their use represents a part of our free and democratic tradition. i trust and believe that will not change in the future. not in boston, not at the boston marathon and not in other important event. we cannot tent violent akts koent threaten our great institution, but our institutions did not become great by following a path of timidity and cowardess. we can only hope it will ris
volatility until there are strong signs that the economy is strengthening. the commerce department said home builders passed the 1,000 mark. the biggest increase was in apartment construction. home building is expected to continue this year. >>> american airlines is recovering after their system went down and they had to cancel all it flights. the cause of that problem was not immediately clear. >>> some boston marathon runners return to the bay area today including an 80-year-old former mayor of santa cruz. they say they are stunned of how quickly the celebration turned to carnage. jana katsuyama shares some of their stories tonight. >> reporter: after all the worry, now the wait. at sfo today family and friends search for familiar faces returning from boston. ashley french ran the marathon last year and had a friend there last year when the bomb exploded. relieved today that that friend finally came home. passengers said heightened security was visible. >> i did notice police with their guns like ready. which you don't normally see. >> reporter: police had extra patrols at sfo and nationwi
to save the victims of the bombings. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. at tyco integrated security, we consider ourselves business optihow?rs. by building custom security solutions that integrate video, access control, fire and intrusion protection. all backed up with world-class monitoring centers, thousands of qualified technicians, and a personal passion to help protect your business. when your business is optimized like that, there's no stopping you. we are tyco integrated security. and we are sharper. . >>> moments after the twin blast was horrific, with the bombs define zooined to do maximum damage, and there were incredible efforts to help the wounded. dr. sanjay going joins us live in boston. i know you've been there for a couple days. it does seem to be bordering on minister rack louse this only three people have died in this. sol was injuries were so appalling, we assumed the death toll would rise quite significantly. >> reporter: yeah, and i think those miracles come in the form of some good
said investors should expect more volatility until there are strong signs that the economy is strengthening. the commerce department said home builders passed the 1,000 mark. the biggest increase was in apartment construction. home building is expected to continue this year. >>> american airlines is recovering after their system went down and they had to cancel all it flights. the cause of that problem was not immediately clear. >>> some boston marathon runners return to the bay area today including an 80-year-old former mayor of santa cruz. they say they are stunned of how quickly the celebration turned to carnage. jana katsuyama shares some of their stories tonight. >> reporter: after all the worry, now the wait. at sfo today family and friends search for familiar faces returning from boston. ashley french ran the marathon last year and had a friend there last year when the bomb exploded. relieved today that that friend finally came home. passengers said heightened security was visible. >> i did notice police with their guns like ready. which you don't normally see. >> re
intelligence before the boston event, that they affect the jobs markets, affects the overall economy in the last month? look, i'm sorry, i just don't buy it. i think it's reprehensible to politicize an event like this. >>gretchen: would be like on the other side if republicans said this maybe had happened because of president obama's foreign policy with regard to terrorism. that would also be outrageous. >> there are two sides to this fence. don't politicize an event like this. don't do it. that's opinion, okay. >>steve: stuart varney is going to have a lot to talk about over at fox business today, 9:20 eastern time where he takes control of that channel each and every week. all right, stewart. >>gretchen: coming up, boston has a message for the attacker. we'll show you how citizens are speaking out now. >>brian: a dad passes out behind the wheel, and his young kids spring into action. >> we're going 90. >>brian: the outcome? >>brian: the outcome? nothing short of a miracle. with its foot-activated lift gate. but that's not all you'll see, cause c-max also beats prius v, with better
, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> happening now, severe storms and a serious threat of tornadoes. let's get straight to jennifer delgado live in the cnn weather center with the details this morning. good morning, jennifer. >> good morning, christine. we're already dealing with thunderstorms right now on the radar with a lot of lightning spreading into parts of the midwest. over towards part of the ohio valley. today the real action really kicks in, especially as we get into the afternoon and the evening hours, because we have cold air to the west, warm, moist air to the south. well, this is going to be the fuel for severe storms. anywhere you see in yellow from chicago all the way down towards parts of texas. this is our slight risk category. anywhere in the red shading, that includes a chance for severe storms. you're talking about a moderate risk. we're talking many of these areas could see some damaging winds, as well as isolated tornadoes. what is causing this is basically we have these two cold air masses, and warm masses that are act
: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> all right. our two breaking headlines of the hour. there has been an arrest in the letters that were laden with ricin sent to a u.s. senator and the u.s. president. a man who lives in tupelo, mississippi, the hometown of senator wicker, the first recipient of one of those letters. so we have an arrest there. and the other news that we have, investigators focusing in very closely on one specific photo that has two men with bags that seemed to be more full than they should be near the finish line. theye lot of photos. they say they just want to talk to these people. but that is the very latest that we have. they're looking at pictures of congregated groups of men to try to ask those questions. we'll be back here live at 11:00. in the meantime, though, "ac360" starts right now. >> thanks very much. good evening, everyone. as erin said, breaking news tonight on two fronts. late word from two federal law enforcement officials that there is an arrest in connection, as erin said, with t
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